Wake County’s Biggest Health Concerns

A new survey issued by Wake County Human Services has asked Wake County residents about their biggest health concerns. The department partners with local hospitals and community members every three years to determine which health concerns are the greatest among citizens, and to study if those concerns have changed.

WRAL reports:

“Every three years, health care leaders in Wake County ask residents to help them track the ever-changing health needs in their communities through the Community Health Needs Assessment.

‘[It helps] to inform how we design programs and provide funding and the services that we as a county support,’ said Sue Lynn Ledford, director of Wake County Public Health.

Ledford says the process for the 2019 assessment is underway and involves an online survey that asks for responses on a range of issues including access to care and quality of life for seniors.”

According to the Wake County government website, the survey is a vast collaboration between multiple organizations and the efforts made every three years will continue. The Community Health Needs Assessment lists results from the previous 2016 survey.  As noted by Wakegov.com: “This is a collaborative effort among Wake County Human Services; WakeMed Health & Hospitals, Duke Raleigh Hospital and UNC Rex Healthcare;  Advance Community Health (formerly known as Wake Health Services); United Way of the Greater Triangle; Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Youth Thrive and Wake County Medical Society Community Health Foundation. The process is overseen by a steering committee made up of more than 60 community partners including local government, hospitals, schools, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations, businesses and other stakeholders.”

WRAL continues:

“’I think people will appreciate the fact that they are helping to guide the direction of the county, because these surveys are taken very seriously,’ [Sue Lynn Ledford] said.

Three years ago, the survey helped identify four top priorities: Access to care, access to health insurance, transportation needs and substance abuse issues. Those challenges still persist across the state and the country.

Ledford said one issue is at the root of many other health concerns.

‘We hear a lot about housing. People cannot be healthy unless the social needs are met,’ she said.”

The 2019 survey closes Aug. 31, and residents are welcome to take it. After Friday, Aug. 31, the survey will no longer be available for viewing.

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