Beautiful Memories: the Nasher Uses Art to Reach Dementia Patients

September 18, 2016

As a part of our ongoing look at mental health in North Carolina, we’re reporting on something that may surprise you: art works, and not just to help occupy our kids’ active brains or to inspire and move us. Studying art may bring memory back to dementia patients. 

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is hosting a monthly interactive tour for older adults dealing with dementia or similar disorders and their caretakers. As it turns out, research is showing that art and music are able to evoke memories, even in impaired patients. The tour allows patients to experience something new, connect with old memories, and expand their creativity and ability to communicate.

Programs similar to Nasher’s are beginning across the country, inspired by Meet Me at MoMA, a program for dementia patients begun by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

If you know someone suffering from dementia, check out the Nasher Museum of Art’s program. You never know what surprising treatments may help your loved one’s health outcomes — and you’ll probably enjoy the tour, while you’re at it!

For more news and information on the healthcare issues in North Carolina, join us. We’ll keep you informed about upcoming legislation that may affect your healthcare outcomes and costs.


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